Explain The Problem Of Evil Essay

Explain The Problem Of Evil Essay-89
This is called skeptical theism because the argument aims to encourage self-skepticism, either by trying to rationalize God's possible hidden motives, or by trying to explain it as a limitation of human ability to know.Most scholars criticize the skeptical theism defense as "devaluing the suffering" and not addressing the premise that God is all-benevolent and should be able to stop all suffering and evil, rather than play a balancing act.The logical form of the argument tries to show a logical impossibility in the coexistence of God and evil, Responses to various versions of the problem of evil, meanwhile, come in three forms: refutations, defenses, and theodicies.

This is called skeptical theism because the argument aims to encourage self-skepticism, either by trying to rationalize God's possible hidden motives, or by trying to explain it as a limitation of human ability to know.Most scholars criticize the skeptical theism defense as "devaluing the suffering" and not addressing the premise that God is all-benevolent and should be able to stop all suffering and evil, rather than play a balancing act.The logical form of the argument tries to show a logical impossibility in the coexistence of God and evil, Responses to various versions of the problem of evil, meanwhile, come in three forms: refutations, defenses, and theodicies.

An argument from evil claims that because evil exists, either God does not exist or does not have all three of those properties.

Attempts to show the contrary have traditionally been discussed under the heading of theodicy.

Besides philosophy of religion, the problem of evil is also important to the field of theology and ethics.

The problem of evil is often formulated in two forms: the logical problem of evil and the evidential problem of evil.

Richard Swinburne maintains that it does not make sense to assume there are greater goods that justify the evil's presence in the world unless we know what they are—without knowledge of what the greater goods could be, one cannot have a successful theodicy.

Thus, some authors see arguments appealing to demons or the fall of man as indeed logically possible, but not very plausible given our knowledge about the world, and so see those arguments as providing defences but not good theodicies.Therefore, they say nature of evil has a necessary role to play in God's plan for a better world.Free will is both a source of good and of evil, and with free will also comes the potential for abuse, as when individuals act immorally.The omnipotence paradoxes, where evil persists in the presence of an all powerful God, raise questions as to the nature of God's omnipotence.There is the further question of how an interference would negate and subjugate the concept of free will, or in other words result in a totalitarian system that creates a lack of freedom.Another point is that those actions of free beings which bring about evil very often diminish the freedom of those who suffer the evil; for example the murder of a young child prevents the child from ever exercising their free will.In such a case the freedom of an innocent child is pitted against the freedom of the evil-doer, it is not clear why God would remain unresponsive and passive.To show that the first premise is plausible, subsequent versions tend to expand on it, such as this modern example: Both of these arguments are understood to be presenting two forms of the 'logical' problem of evil.They attempt to show that the assumed propositions lead to a logical contradiction and therefore cannot all be correct.In the fire a fawn is trapped, horribly burned, and lies in terrible agony for several days before death relieves its suffering." The evidential problem of evil (also referred to as the probabilistic or inductive version of the problem) seeks to show that the existence of evil, although logically consistent with the existence of God, counts against or lowers the probability of the truth of theism.As an example, a critic of Plantinga's idea of "a mighty nonhuman spirit" causing natural evils may concede that the existence of such a being is not logically impossible but argue that due to lacking scientific evidence for its existence this is very unlikely and thus it is an unconvincing explanation for the presence of natural evils.

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