Frederick Douglass Rhetorical Analysis Essay

Frederick Douglass Rhetorical Analysis Essay-37
Rhetorical Analysis of Douglass In the excerpt “Learning to Read and Write”, Frederick Douglass talks about his experiences in slavery living in his masters house and his struggle to learn how to read and write.Frederick Douglass was an African American social reformer, orator, writer, and statesman.These words used to trouble them; they would express for me the liveliest sympathy…

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Frederick Douglass most likely chose this audience because many slaves probably did not know the extent of how important it was to read and write, or just didn’t know it was important at all.

Frederick Douglass wanted slaves to be TABLE to know what was happening in society and what was going on around them that their masters were not telling them.

He then goes on to describe how his mistress changed from a nice lady to a mean-spirited one.

He explains how her doing so made it hard for him to read because she would always get angry whenever she would see him holding a book.

There could be a number of different audiences that Frederick Douglass was referring to, but the least likely would be extremely racist slave owners.

Racist slave owners probably wouldn’t even pick up something an African American wrote, let alone care hat he had to say.There wasn’t any flash backs or foreshadowing in this excerpt. If Frederick Douglass did decide o use any literary time elements such as foreshadowing and flashbacks, it could have made this excerpt a bit more interesting. Frederick Douglass main claim to his argument of the importance of slaves learning how to read and write is the fact that without that knowledge, slaves would just remain ignorant to the things happening around him.With slaves being ignorant to their surroundings, it would be impossible for them to grow or to reach freedom.He meets two white men who encourage him to run away to the north to be free.Frederick considers it, but he wants to learn how to write first.By not giving up, he shows us how important he thinks it is for slaves to learn how to read and write.We also know that his other audience were white Americans because of his use of contrast.He concludes this excerpt by describing how he learned to write by being in a ship-yard and also by daring the white kids that he knew more letters than them, tricking them into teaching him more letters.There wasn’t any flashbacks or foreshadowing in this excerpt. If Frederick Douglass did decide to use any literary time elements such as foreshadowing and flashbacks, it could have made this excerpt a bit more interesting. Frederick Douglass’s main claim to his argument of the importance of slaves learning how to read and write is the fact that without that knowledge, slaves would just remain ignorant to the things happening around him.The Logos in this excerpt has a structure of Frederick Douglass events going in chronological order.He opens this excerpt by telling how long he lived at his master’s house.

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